Murderer Khouri Green’s Criminal Record

Murderer Khouri Green's Criminal Record 1

Catch and release” is for fish, not criminals. Judges are failing to protect the public because our justice system is broken. There exist few better examples of this than the many judiciary releases of violent and vicious, criminal trash such as Khouri Lamar Green. When you look at murderer Khouri Green’s criminal record [much lower down this posting], you can only wonder how any judge could have granted him bail.

freejailKhouri Green’s release

To understand the situation concerning Khouri Green’s release onto the streets of British Columbia whereupon he murdered Colin Hill, it is necessary that you are first familiar with some of the legal criteria behind the basic terms “bail” and “probation”.

Only through this understanding will you be able properly assess  the performance of our judges. It is their duty to punish criminals, protect you and to deter crime. I think it is obvious that our judges failed us in Khouri Green’s case and in many other cases.

The Entitlement to “Bail” or to “Probation” have as their core tenet the protection of the public. The two differ in their exact criteria, but by understanding bail you will also understand probation. Thus, for the purposes of this discussion I will treat them as equal.  There is one caveat. Bail is extended to an accused and probation to a convicted individual.

Understanding Entitlement To Bail

bail bondsBail is a privilege that may be extended to an accused as the accused awaits trial. The basis in law for bail is that the accused has not yet been found guilty of any crime. Therefore, there should not be a sacrifice of freedom required.

In BC an accused is entitled to bail under a three part test. For bail to be denied, Crown must show why the detention of the accused in necessary.

  1. in order to ensure that the accused will attend court.
  2. in order to maintain confidence in the administration of justice.
  3. in order to protect the public.

Criterion #1: Will The Accused Attend Court?

A judge is required to also assess the likelihood of conviction of the accused. If that likelihood is substantial, the judge might not grant bail under #1, above, if in the judge’s mind that likelihood might mean that the accused will not actually show up for court. This consideration is especially relied upon in cases in which the accused faces considerable time in jail, when and if found guilty.law book

Still looking at #1, beyond that consideration, suffice it to say that past behavior is the best predictor of future behavior. So this decision as to whether or not the accused is likely to attend court can easily be made based on the track record of the accused. If no track record exists, then the person should probably be allowed bail based on “benefit of the doubt”. Of course that assumes the individual qualifies under the other two criteria.

Criterion #2: Will The Release Of The Accused Maintain Public Confidence In The Administration Of Justice?

When you have a day or two we can spend that time discussing this component of the three part evaluation, depending on the crime, and perhaps never come to a conclusion. However, I do think we can all agree that granting bail to an accused murderer, or an accused armed robber, or those accused of any of a number of other violent and/or dangerous crimes would have an effect on how the public might assess its faith in the justice system. That being said, let’s focus our attention on the last of the three criteria, the one which I hope to show you that the courts are far too lenient, namely the criterion of protecting the public.

go to jail cardCriterion #3: Is Remanding The Accused To Custody Needed To Protect The Public?

In making this determination, I think it is a “no brainer” that the various crimes discussed in the “public confidence” aspect of bail consideration, above, can readily be assumed to be crimes which would also cause the accused to be denied bail under the public risk category, as in general, those crimes are crimes which put people at risk. Remember, although the question of bail might arise because of a particular charge, the courts should decide bail with an eye toward the person’s entire circumstances and history and not looking solely at the currently charged offense.

Therefore, in making the evaluation required by this final component the courts must also consider the risk factors as to whether or not the accused is probable to commit the same offense again, or to commit a different offense that might be suggested by the criminal history of the accused.

williams-sentencingCan Denial Of Bail Be Lawfully Used As A Deterrent? Would It Be An Effective Deterrent?

Since bail is a privilege, the answer to the first part of this question is an obvious, “Yes”. Would it be an effective deterrent? Allow me to answer that question with three rhetorical questions.

  1. Is sending criminals to jail immediately more effective as a deterrent than allowing them to run free for six months, twelve months or even eighteen months while they await trial?
  2. Is not “swift” justice the most effective form of justice?
  3. Is failure to discourage an action not tantamount to encouraging that action?  Think about this for a minute. If you put a bag with a dozen cookies in it on the kitchen counter and don’t tell your kid that there will be consequences if he/she gets into the bag, how many cookies will be remaining when you reach in for your cookie twenty minutes later?

Bail Versus Drug Dealing, Versus Protecting The Public

Are street drugs a danger to the public? The answer is obviously, “Yes”. In fact, the law has averred they are dangerous to the public. If they were not, the government would have no reason to declare them “illegal”. drug stash

Accordingly, by “black letter law” anybody dealing in those illegal, street drugs is a danger to the public. That being the case, it also follows that anybody caught dealing those illegal substances could be, and probably should be, denied bail under the need to protect the public. This is especially true if there is a likelihood that such an individual might repeat that offense while out on bail.

Who Qualifies As A Member Of The Public?

I think the Canadian Charter makes that clear. Everybody is a member of the public and that we are all entitled to equal protections by the courts and by the various law enforcement agencies.

That being the case, a burglar, a street person, and even a drug dealer, despite their failures in the eyes of society, are each members of the public.  Therefore the courts NEED to protect their rights. Although protecting criminals’ rights does NOT mean setting obvious prolific offenders loose on the streets to victimize the public.

Khouri Green’s list of aliases from the Global BC web site.

  • Khouri Lamar Ricardo Green.
  • Kid.
  • Cory Geddes.
  • Michael Frakson.
  • Khouri Lamar Mohamed.
  • Khouri Lama Green.
  • Frankie Michaels.
  • Tyrell Brown.
  • Michael Franky.
  • Frankie Geddes.

Are you ready to be absolutely astounded? Are you ready for Khouri Green’s criminal record? This is just in the last four years?

As you study Khouri Green’s rap sheet, please note that he was a drug dealer, and a drug addict and that he physically fought with police. Lastly, note the myriad of times that he breached every conditional release given him.

202512-1 1 21-Dec-2010 CDS – 5(2) Possession for the purpose of trafficking Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Ricardo Vancouver B.C.
202512-1 2 21-Dec-2010 CDS – 4(1) Possession of Controlled Substance Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Ricardo Vancouver B.C.
202512-2-A 1 04-Feb-2011 CCC – 145(3) Breach of undertaking or recognizance Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Vancouver B.C.
202512-3 1 17-May-2011 CCC – 524(1) Application for Warrant to issue Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Ricardo

It Continues

202534-2 1 17-May-2011 CCC – 524(1) Application for Warrant to issue Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Ricardo
202534-3-A 1 24-Jan-2012 CCC – 145(3) Breach of undertaking or recognizance Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Vancouver B.C.
202534-4-S 1 19-Mar-2012 CCC – 742.6 Breach of Conditional Sentence Order Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Ricardo
202534-5-S 1 12-Apr-2013 CCC – 742.6 Breach of Conditional Sentence Order Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Ricardo

There is more

184721-1-B 1 30-Aug-2010 YCJ – 137 fail to comply with sentence/surcharge/disposition Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Surrey B.C.
184721-1-B 2 11-Sep-2010 YCJ – 137 fail to comply with sentence/surcharge/disposition Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Surrey B.C.

 

188665-1 1 17-May-2011 CCC – 355(b) PSP Under $5,000 Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Surrey B.C.

There is EVEN more

189476-1 1 14-May-2011 CCC – 348(1)(d) break and enter a dwelling with intent or commit Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Surrey B.C.
189476-2-B 1 28-Feb-2012 CCC – 733.1(1) Breach of Probation Order Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Surrey B.C.

It gets worse

192452-1 1 04-Jan-2012 CCC – 348(1)(a) break and enter with intent to commit offence Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Surrey B.C.
192452-1 2 04-Jan-2012 CCC – 733.1(1) Breach of Probation Order Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Surrey B.C.
192452-2-C 1 04-Jan-2012 CCC – 348(1)(d) break and enter a dwelling with intent or commit Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Surrey B.C.
192452-4-A 1 13-Nov-2012 CCC – 145(2)(b) Failing to appear pursuant to court order Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Surrey B.C.

And worse yet

200508-1 1 23-Dec-2012 CCC – 348(1)(b) break and enter and commit indictable offence Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Del

Just when you thought there couldn’t be more

202512-1 1 21-Dec-2010 CDS – 5(2) Possession for the purpose of trafficking Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Ricardo Vancouver B.C.
202512-1 2 21-Dec-2010 CDS – 4(1) Possession of Controlled Substance Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Ricardo Vancouver B.C.
202512-2-A 1 04-Feb-2011 CCC – 145(3) Breach of undertaking or recognizance Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Vancouver B.C.
202512-3 1 17-May-2011 CCC – 524(1) Application for Warrant to issue Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Ricardo

We’re not done yet

202534-2 1 17-May-2011 CCC – 524(1) Application for Warrant to issue Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Ricardo
202534-3-A 1 24-Jan-2012 CCC – 145(3) Breach of undertaking or recognizance Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Vancouver B.C.
202534-4-S 1 19-Mar-2012 CCC – 742.6 Breach of Conditional Sentence Order Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Ricardo
202534-5-S 1 12-Apr-2013 CCC – 742.6 Breach of Conditional Sentence Order Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Ricardo

Still not yet

225463-7-C 1 03-May-2012 CCC – 348(1)(d) break and enter a dwelling with intent or commit Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar/ RAHEMTULLA, IMRAN Mohamed Burnaby B.C.
225463-7-C 3 03-May-2012 CCC – 355 Possession of Stolen Property Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Burnaby B.C.
225463-7-C 4 03-May-2012 CCC – 129(a) wilfully resisting or obstructing a peace officer Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Burnaby B.C.
225463-8-A 1 07-Jun-2014 CCC – 145(3) Breach of undertaking or recognizance Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar

Can you believe Khouri Green’s criminal record? Can you believe a judge actually gave him bail?

225463-7-C 1 03-May-2012 CCC – 348(1)(d) break and enter a dwelling with intent or commit Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar/ RAHEMTULLA, IMRAN Mohamed Burnaby BC
225463-7-C 3 03-May-2012 CCC – 355 Possession of Stolen Property Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Burnaby BC
225463-8-A 1 07-Jun-2014 CCC – 145(3) Breach of undertaking or recognizance Commit GREEN, KHOURI Lamar Surrey

With Khouri Green’s criminal record, how could anybody in their right mind determine him NOT to be a threat to the public?

But He Had A Tough Childhood; “I Don’t Give A Damn”

tough childhoodNobody should care about his tough childhood. Khouri Green’s criminal record is not a product of his childhood. It is a product, to a large degree, of his drug use.

Neither his childhood, nor his drug use, confer on him any right to break into your home or anybody’s home. And they do not entitle him to bail or probation.

Khouri Green’s actions were all his and nobody elses. I can guarantee you that my childhood was just as tough as his.

Colin Hill would be alive today if the courts had done their job.

if-youre-not-outraged-youre-not-paying-attention

My voice is limited; yours is limitless

Do you agree or disagree?  Participate in the discussion at the bottom of the page. Also, share this article on social media with one of the links below.  Make yourself heard!

About Hal 160 Articles
Ex-golf inventor, Ex-stockbroker, author, blogger, social activist, drug counselor, public speaker

8 Comments

  1. Are u kidding me? Rap music caused this lol nope. Anger issues caused this. Inability of the government to rehabilitate people caused this. Most of all ignorance from people just like you caused this.

    • Please re-read the posting. I did NOT say that rap music caused it. I would have never made an excuse for a person’s actions. I don’t believe in excuses. What I said was that rap music is a bad influence.

  2. I was a with this guy in Surrey pretrial. You can call him trash but the biggest thing is they DO NOT REHABILITATE CRIMINALS. say whatever you want about us (I’m a criminal too, not currently breaking the law not on probation either) but they never tried to help khouri. You can say that he is trash that I’m trash. But guess what 99% of us get released again, he will be out again one day too. His anger issues were ignored by the BC corrections staff. No such thing as rehabilitation in provincial jail/ prison. So you go to provincial jail if it’s a sentence under 2 years, you go to federal prison for anything over 2 years. So you basically have to do something so horrible you get a long sentence in order to get help from a councillor. This is unacceptable. It makes no sense. He never was talked to by a professional. Saying the judge should have been harder on him etc etc. They had him in jail. They never tried to help him. They never had a sit down convo with him about why he is angry or why he commits crimes. You know why? Because they don’t fucking care. There job is to house you, feed you, and stop you from dying in custody. So this guy’s death is a product of a failed legal system. Specifically the fact they do not rehabilitate anyone in provincial systems. So go ahead and blame him say he’s trash but this could have been prevented with a councillor talking with him 1 hour a day 3or 4 days a week. SURREY WHAT

    • Number 1. Congratulations on what you are doing with your life.
      Number 2. I agree, the state of the provincial prison/jail system is sad.
      Number 3. Had judges been harder and more realistic, Khouri would have been sentenced to more than two years on many occasions. Had that occurred as it should have, he might have had a better chance.
      Number 4. You fought your way past your anger, as others have. While I hear what you are saying, there is something called “manning up”. Khouri refused to do such.
      Number 5. You may assign blame as you like, but reality is that Khouri did the murder and he is ultimately to blame for it, nobody else. Where I grew up in Texas, we called it “ownership”.

      Finally, I recognize that it took passion and courage for you to write what you did. I commend you and both and sincerely wish you the best.

  3. My question is what if Colin Hill was able to get, own and use a firearm as easily as his killer was? He would be alive today, or if the other law abiding, honest citizens that “Lamar” or whatever his name is, victimized, had one, he’d have been stopped years ago. We can all bemoan the courts, the gov’t, the schools, the decline of family, culture, etc. that caused this mess, but why is it only the bad guys have easy access to guns? I’m guessing “diversity is our strength” didn’t help poor Colin Hill or his family, but a home defense firearm would have served well someone brave enough like he was to buy his family time to be safe with his life. I don’t know if Canada has an NRA type organization here, but this case is a textbook example of why we need better gun laws that protect honest citizens, as we’ll never keep guns out of scumbags hands, why fight them with our hands tied behind our back?

    • I am a dual citizen of the U.S. and Canada. Having grown up in Texas, I owned 4 guns by the time I was 14 years old, one of those weapons being a 38 Smith and Wesson revolver. Additionally, having put murderer Wyatt Prince in jail through working with the police and testifying, I would love to have a gun at the ready.

      I absolutely agree with everything you said. However, I don’t think we, as Canadians, will ever see the day when we are allowed to properly arm ourselves.

  4. Thank you for your approval. Re: “black ghetto rap”, it’s not just “black” but rap from all races that fall under what I refer to as “gangster rap”. I believe any rap that teaches disrespect for women and/or glorifies violence and criminality desensitizes our youth, and therefore, is dangerous.

  5. Your first line says it all!
    If that was a campaign slogan for a federal political party, you’d have my vote without hesitation!
    We need change desperately.
    Oh but one would say “but the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms”… Blah blah blah.
    But I would respond that you lost your rights when you committed a serious crime. The public must be protected above all else. That is our right.
    Time for tough reform.
    I agree with you wholeheartedly Hal.

    Also without sounding racist, what is with this “rap culture” the offender was so obsessed with? Rapping about guns, gangs, drugs, money, murder, killing… Don’t understand the glorified “hate” engrained in black ghetto rap culture.

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